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Should automatic emergency braking systems be required for new vehicles?

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Transport Canada wants feedback on updating the Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations to require automatic emergency braking and pedestrian automatic emergency braking on all new vehicles in Canada, in particular school buses and commercial trucks, but also passenger cars, multi-purpose passenger vehicles, and buses.

Automatic emergency braking (AEB) is a technology that monitors a vehicle’s surroundings when it is in motion, and automatically applies the brakes if an imminent crash is detected. The system doesn’t replace the driver’s reaction, but is a last resort to reduce speed if a driver doesn’t react. By slowing the vehicle before a collision, the collision will be less severe, and in some cases it could be completely avoided.

Pedestrian automatic emergency braking (P-AEB) adds another function to an automatic emergency braking system. Pedestrian automatic emergency braking also applies the brakes if an imminent collision with a pedestrian is detected, with the same purpose to slow the vehicle and reduce the collision severity, and in some cases also prevent the collision completely.

Some countries have performance requirements for AEB and P-AEB in light vehicles, but none have both features for heavy vehicles. We may need to develop Canadian requirements for pedestrian automatic emergency braking in heavy vehicles (like large commercial trucks and buses).

We plan on introducing new requirements using an outcome-based approach, when possible. Outcome-based regulations focus on the results we want from a regulation, instead of a specific process or action that must be followed. Using outcome-based regulations would give companies some flexibility to choose the best way for them to meet the requirement, and help them develop and introduce new systems.

An outcome-based approach provides broader regulations, meaning we may be able to accept systems that are shown to comply with international requirements that have the same safety goals. In some cases, Transport Canada may add special conditions or tests to the outcome-based approach to confirm our safety goals are met.

We want your thoughts on updating the Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations to add a new requirement for automatic emergency braking systems and pedestrian automatic emergency braking systems. This is an informal consultation after which a regulatory proposal will be published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, followed by a formal comment period. You will also have the opportunity to provide feedback as part of the Canada Gazette process. The final regulatory requirements will be published in the Canada Gazette, Part II.

We want to hear from you

We want to hear from stakeholders and the Canadian public. Your opinions and feedback are important. Please read our background document, and our explanation on outcome-based regulations, then have your say. There are three ways to participate:

  1. Send a formal written submission via the “Submissions” tab by September 30, 2020.
  2. Participate in our discussion forum through the “Have your say” tab. The forum will be open until September 30, 2020. To participate, please go to "register" at the top of the page or sign in.
  3. Send in your comments by email to RegulationsClerk-ASFB-Commisauxreglements@tc.gc.ca, and include “AEB Informal Consultation” in the subject line.

As set out in sections 19 and 20 of the Access to Information Act, be sure to identify any parts of your comments that we shouldn’t make public because they include personal information or third-party information. Explain why your comments should be kept private, and for how long.

Unless you tell us a section is private, it could appear in any regulatory proposal that Transport Canada publishes in the Canada Gazette.

Have your say

We are looking for feedback on six questions, including one on the discussion forum and five in the background document. You can also submit comments about general issues related to these technologies being required on some new vehicles in Canada.

Please be sure to include data, technical information or other proof to support your comments.

Transport Canada wants feedback on updating the Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations to require automatic emergency braking and pedestrian automatic emergency braking on all new vehicles in Canada, in particular school buses and commercial trucks, but also passenger cars, multi-purpose passenger vehicles, and buses.

Automatic emergency braking (AEB) is a technology that monitors a vehicle’s surroundings when it is in motion, and automatically applies the brakes if an imminent crash is detected. The system doesn’t replace the driver’s reaction, but is a last resort to reduce speed if a driver doesn’t react. By slowing the vehicle before a collision, the collision will be less severe, and in some cases it could be completely avoided.

Pedestrian automatic emergency braking (P-AEB) adds another function to an automatic emergency braking system. Pedestrian automatic emergency braking also applies the brakes if an imminent collision with a pedestrian is detected, with the same purpose to slow the vehicle and reduce the collision severity, and in some cases also prevent the collision completely.

Some countries have performance requirements for AEB and P-AEB in light vehicles, but none have both features for heavy vehicles. We may need to develop Canadian requirements for pedestrian automatic emergency braking in heavy vehicles (like large commercial trucks and buses).

We plan on introducing new requirements using an outcome-based approach, when possible. Outcome-based regulations focus on the results we want from a regulation, instead of a specific process or action that must be followed. Using outcome-based regulations would give companies some flexibility to choose the best way for them to meet the requirement, and help them develop and introduce new systems.

An outcome-based approach provides broader regulations, meaning we may be able to accept systems that are shown to comply with international requirements that have the same safety goals. In some cases, Transport Canada may add special conditions or tests to the outcome-based approach to confirm our safety goals are met.

We want your thoughts on updating the Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations to add a new requirement for automatic emergency braking systems and pedestrian automatic emergency braking systems. This is an informal consultation after which a regulatory proposal will be published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, followed by a formal comment period. You will also have the opportunity to provide feedback as part of the Canada Gazette process. The final regulatory requirements will be published in the Canada Gazette, Part II.

We want to hear from you

We want to hear from stakeholders and the Canadian public. Your opinions and feedback are important. Please read our background document, and our explanation on outcome-based regulations, then have your say. There are three ways to participate:

  1. Send a formal written submission via the “Submissions” tab by September 30, 2020.
  2. Participate in our discussion forum through the “Have your say” tab. The forum will be open until September 30, 2020. To participate, please go to "register" at the top of the page or sign in.
  3. Send in your comments by email to RegulationsClerk-ASFB-Commisauxreglements@tc.gc.ca, and include “AEB Informal Consultation” in the subject line.

As set out in sections 19 and 20 of the Access to Information Act, be sure to identify any parts of your comments that we shouldn’t make public because they include personal information or third-party information. Explain why your comments should be kept private, and for how long.

Unless you tell us a section is private, it could appear in any regulatory proposal that Transport Canada publishes in the Canada Gazette.

Have your say

We are looking for feedback on six questions, including one on the discussion forum and five in the background document. You can also submit comments about general issues related to these technologies being required on some new vehicles in Canada.

Please be sure to include data, technical information or other proof to support your comments.

  • Consultation has concluded
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