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Let’s Talk Pleasure Craft Safety

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Consultation has concluded

New technology and improved standards offer additional options for safety equipment on pleasure craft. Transport Canada (TC) is reviewing the benefits and risks of accepting new options for Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs) and Electronic Visual Distress Signals Devices (eVDSD).

We want your input on the safety equipment for boaters.

New Options for Personal Flotation Devices

1) Level 50 Buoyancy Aids

New options are available in Canadian standards for a more compact PFD, which is intended for:

  • near shore sheltered waters; and
  • activities where assistance is nearby.

These devices are not as buoyant, are less bulky, lighter in weight, and are intended for those with swimming skills. Boaters are likely to find them more comfortable and wearable.

2) Youth Inflatable PFDs

Inflatable PFDs are:

  • generally accepted as being more comfortable to wear;
  • clearly distinguishable from the foam child devices that young teens may be resistant to wear; and
  • not intended for weak or non-swimmers.

To learn more, see Level 50 and youth inflatable buoyancy aids information paper, and read the Frequently Asked Questions.

New Options for Electronic Visual Distress Signals

A new standard is available for electronic visual distress signals. Signals certified to this standard could:

  • provide an alternative to traditional pyrotechnic flares;
  • decrease many of the storage and disposal challenges faced by boaters now required to carry flares on their boats;
  • they do not expire; and
  • do not burn with extreme heat.

To learn more, see the electronic visual distress signals instead of pyrotechnic signals information paper, and read the Frequently Asked Questions.

How to participate

  • Read the information papers
  • Join the discussion forum via the “Have your say” tab, or
  • Send a formal written submission via the “Submissions” tab

New technology and improved standards offer additional options for safety equipment on pleasure craft. Transport Canada (TC) is reviewing the benefits and risks of accepting new options for Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs) and Electronic Visual Distress Signals Devices (eVDSD).

We want your input on the safety equipment for boaters.

New Options for Personal Flotation Devices

1) Level 50 Buoyancy Aids

New options are available in Canadian standards for a more compact PFD, which is intended for:

  • near shore sheltered waters; and
  • activities where assistance is nearby.

These devices are not as buoyant, are less bulky, lighter in weight, and are intended for those with swimming skills. Boaters are likely to find them more comfortable and wearable.

2) Youth Inflatable PFDs

Inflatable PFDs are:

  • generally accepted as being more comfortable to wear;
  • clearly distinguishable from the foam child devices that young teens may be resistant to wear; and
  • not intended for weak or non-swimmers.

To learn more, see Level 50 and youth inflatable buoyancy aids information paper, and read the Frequently Asked Questions.

New Options for Electronic Visual Distress Signals

A new standard is available for electronic visual distress signals. Signals certified to this standard could:

  • provide an alternative to traditional pyrotechnic flares;
  • decrease many of the storage and disposal challenges faced by boaters now required to carry flares on their boats;
  • they do not expire; and
  • do not burn with extreme heat.

To learn more, see the electronic visual distress signals instead of pyrotechnic signals information paper, and read the Frequently Asked Questions.

How to participate

  • Read the information papers
  • Join the discussion forum via the “Have your say” tab, or
  • Send a formal written submission via the “Submissions” tab
CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
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