What are the pros or cons to amending the regulations to require minimum noise standards for HEVs? | Minimum Noise Requirements for Hybrid and Electric Vehicles | Let's Talk Transportation

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What are the pros or cons to amending the regulations to require minimum noise standards for HEVs?

over 1 year ago

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  • AlCormier over 1 year ago
    I don't believe the proposed regulation is needed in Canada. it was not needed in the USA either. With modern cars, all are very quiet at low speeds, including ICE vehicles.
  • K. Habicht over 1 year ago
    More research should be done to consider the impact that these proposed noises would have on wildlife. Noise is not just an issue for people. Many animals rely on sound for communication, finding prey, or avoiding predators. If a sound requirement is imposed this may change animal behaviour around cars. Animals may be better able to avoid vehicles, or they could be confused by the sound and be involved in more collisions. In addition the sound chosen may have an impact on wildlife health, mating patterns, and general stress levels. K. Habicht
  • TChelli over 1 year ago
    Yes, regulations should be amended to require minimum noise standards for HEV's, two reasons.1. To maintain harmonization with USA. Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations were predominately derived from US NHTSA standards. Maintaining harmonization provides access to vehicles by means of economy of scale for the whole North American motor vehicle market. Canada Unique models end up being prohibitively expensive.2. More importantly, a minimum noise standard for HEV's provides an increased measure of safety for those with an impairment. This is easy for those without an impairment to overlook, but could be life threatening for those with an impairment who do not recognize an oncoming vehicle. Have you ever had a close call as a pedestrian, you know walking off the curb before looking both ways, I remember doing it on Bank Street in Ottawa one day. I didn't step off the curb, was preparing to and I had not yet looked to my left when I did, a bus crossed my path, no further than 12 inches away.I remember the shock that situation created, not consider the same scenario where an impaired pedestrian faces that situation more frequently because of silent vehicles. It unnecessarily puts impaired individuals life at risk. Sure we love environmentally clean vehicles, but I don't remember saying I wanted stealth vehicles. Tim Chelli