Let’s Talk Drones 2022

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Consultation has concluded

Transport Canada is working closely with industry and other key stakeholders to create an environment where Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS), or drones, can be flown, enjoyed and contribute to innovation while keeping the skies safe in Canada.

The Canadian Drone Advisory Committee (CanaDAC) is a strategic policy forum that supports innovation and long-term growth of the drone industry in Canada through contributions to Transport Canada policy development and strategic direction-setting over the coming years.

Transport Canada and the CanaDAC would like to hear from you about our first year of work to help guide future directions of the committee.

We want to hear your thoughts on:

  • Priority drone topics identified by the CanaDAC
    1. Advanced Air Mobility
    2. Social Acceptance of Drones
    3. Research and Development
  • The recommendations developed by the CanaDAC task groups
  • Transport Canada’s next steps

Fast facts about the CanaDAC

  • The committee was formed in Spring 2021 and meets three times a year to provide recommendations to Transport Canada that may influence future policy on drones.
  • The committee has representation from many fields, including academia, government, training providers, NGOs, manufacturers, and more.
  • There are three task groups comprised of committee members, international observers, and external experts that investigate the priority areas in greater detail.
  • The three CanaDAC task groups recently completed their taskings and presented their findings at the April 21, 2022 CanaDAC meeting.
  • The feedback you provide now will help to inform Transport Canada’s next steps and response to the task groups’ work.

Work of the CanaDAC Task Groups:

Advanced Air Mobility (AAM)

The AAM task group was asked to develop a description of the term AAM, as well as a vision and key objectives for AAM. The task group described AAM as: “the evolution of air transportation enabled by an ecosystem of new technologies allowing people, goods, and services to move within urban and regional areas safely.” Other conclusions, such as the industry and consumer visions, principles and objectives, and key actors involved in AAM can be viewed in the full report.

Social Acceptance

The Social Acceptance task group was asked to identify the key barriers to social acceptance of drones in Canada, the impacts on the sector if the barriers are not addressed, and recommend areas where action could be taken. Some barriers the task group found were safety concerns, privacy concerns, and people seeing drones as a disturbance to their communities. The task group recommended increased demonstration of drone safety, education, and the promotion of equity and diversity to help avoid negative impacts on drone innovation and the economy.

Research and Development (R&D):

The R&D task group was asked to perform a scan of R&D activities in Canada. The task group identified the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) as a significant source of early-stage drone technology development. The task group also concluded that much of the drone R&D work being done in Canada is difficult to gain access to and may not be fully aligned with industry’s needs. The group concluded more efforts are required in facilitating commercialization of drone technology in Canada and recommended the creation of an R&D Roundtable to promote information-sharing and avoid duplication of efforts.

How to participate

The comments received here will allow Transport Canada and the committee to understand your point of view on drones. To participate:

  1. Go to Register at the top of the page to get involved
  2. Give us your opinions in the discussion forum
  3. Share your thoughts and feedback on the materials developed by the CanaDAC task groups or Transport Canada
  4. Send us your questions using the questions tab

Transport Canada is working closely with industry and other key stakeholders to create an environment where Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS), or drones, can be flown, enjoyed and contribute to innovation while keeping the skies safe in Canada.

The Canadian Drone Advisory Committee (CanaDAC) is a strategic policy forum that supports innovation and long-term growth of the drone industry in Canada through contributions to Transport Canada policy development and strategic direction-setting over the coming years.

Transport Canada and the CanaDAC would like to hear from you about our first year of work to help guide future directions of the committee.

We want to hear your thoughts on:

  • Priority drone topics identified by the CanaDAC
    1. Advanced Air Mobility
    2. Social Acceptance of Drones
    3. Research and Development
  • The recommendations developed by the CanaDAC task groups
  • Transport Canada’s next steps

Fast facts about the CanaDAC

  • The committee was formed in Spring 2021 and meets three times a year to provide recommendations to Transport Canada that may influence future policy on drones.
  • The committee has representation from many fields, including academia, government, training providers, NGOs, manufacturers, and more.
  • There are three task groups comprised of committee members, international observers, and external experts that investigate the priority areas in greater detail.
  • The three CanaDAC task groups recently completed their taskings and presented their findings at the April 21, 2022 CanaDAC meeting.
  • The feedback you provide now will help to inform Transport Canada’s next steps and response to the task groups’ work.

Work of the CanaDAC Task Groups:

Advanced Air Mobility (AAM)

The AAM task group was asked to develop a description of the term AAM, as well as a vision and key objectives for AAM. The task group described AAM as: “the evolution of air transportation enabled by an ecosystem of new technologies allowing people, goods, and services to move within urban and regional areas safely.” Other conclusions, such as the industry and consumer visions, principles and objectives, and key actors involved in AAM can be viewed in the full report.

Social Acceptance

The Social Acceptance task group was asked to identify the key barriers to social acceptance of drones in Canada, the impacts on the sector if the barriers are not addressed, and recommend areas where action could be taken. Some barriers the task group found were safety concerns, privacy concerns, and people seeing drones as a disturbance to their communities. The task group recommended increased demonstration of drone safety, education, and the promotion of equity and diversity to help avoid negative impacts on drone innovation and the economy.

Research and Development (R&D):

The R&D task group was asked to perform a scan of R&D activities in Canada. The task group identified the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) as a significant source of early-stage drone technology development. The task group also concluded that much of the drone R&D work being done in Canada is difficult to gain access to and may not be fully aligned with industry’s needs. The group concluded more efforts are required in facilitating commercialization of drone technology in Canada and recommended the creation of an R&D Roundtable to promote information-sharing and avoid duplication of efforts.

How to participate

The comments received here will allow Transport Canada and the committee to understand your point of view on drones. To participate:

  1. Go to Register at the top of the page to get involved
  2. Give us your opinions in the discussion forum
  3. Share your thoughts and feedback on the materials developed by the CanaDAC task groups or Transport Canada
  4. Send us your questions using the questions tab
CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.