Let’s Talk Aviation Safety – Updating the Vancouver International Airport Zoning Regulations

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Transport Canada wants to update the Vancouver International Airport Regulations, which haven’t been updated for over 30 years. The changes we’re proposing will limit the heights of future development near the airport. They will also include rules that minimize the risk of bird strikes and ban electronic interference with communications to and from aircraft.

Background

In Canada some airports require specific airport zoning regulations. These rules keep the lands near the airport from being used in a way that would affect the safety of the airport’s operations.

These regulations limit the heights of buildings and trees on the approach and departure paths to the runways and in specific areas around the airport. For safe take-offs and landings, there needs to be space between aircraft and the highest nearby object to reduce the risk of an accident.

In addition to the height limits, the regulations aim to reduce the risk of aircraft hitting birds by banning some types of land uses that could attract birds – like garbage dumps and large storm water management ponds.

Electronic signals that interfere with a plane’s navigational aids could lead to an accident. The current regulations don’t address this important issue.

Proposal

The Vancouver International Airport Zoning Regulations were first published in 1980. During a regular review of the airport’s master plan, the Vancouver Airport Authority felt that they needed to increase the airport’s ability to manage more air traffic within the next 30 years.

Given that the area around the airport is being developed quickly, the airport authority asked Transport Canada to update the regulations. The proposed regulations will allow the airport authority to move ahead with long-term planning for significant infrastructure and capital investment projects, while adding another level of protection for flight crews, aircraft passengers, and members of nearby communities.

We want to hear from you

  1. Choose “Register” at the top of the page, and join the discussion under the “Have Your Say” tab
  2. You can also submit your comments in a Word or PDF document through the “Submissions” tab (one or more documents can be uploaded)

Transport Canada wants to update the Vancouver International Airport Regulations, which haven’t been updated for over 30 years. The changes we’re proposing will limit the heights of future development near the airport. They will also include rules that minimize the risk of bird strikes and ban electronic interference with communications to and from aircraft.

Background

In Canada some airports require specific airport zoning regulations. These rules keep the lands near the airport from being used in a way that would affect the safety of the airport’s operations.

These regulations limit the heights of buildings and trees on the approach and departure paths to the runways and in specific areas around the airport. For safe take-offs and landings, there needs to be space between aircraft and the highest nearby object to reduce the risk of an accident.

In addition to the height limits, the regulations aim to reduce the risk of aircraft hitting birds by banning some types of land uses that could attract birds – like garbage dumps and large storm water management ponds.

Electronic signals that interfere with a plane’s navigational aids could lead to an accident. The current regulations don’t address this important issue.

Proposal

The Vancouver International Airport Zoning Regulations were first published in 1980. During a regular review of the airport’s master plan, the Vancouver Airport Authority felt that they needed to increase the airport’s ability to manage more air traffic within the next 30 years.

Given that the area around the airport is being developed quickly, the airport authority asked Transport Canada to update the regulations. The proposed regulations will allow the airport authority to move ahead with long-term planning for significant infrastructure and capital investment projects, while adding another level of protection for flight crews, aircraft passengers, and members of nearby communities.

We want to hear from you

  1. Choose “Register” at the top of the page, and join the discussion under the “Have Your Say” tab
  2. You can also submit your comments in a Word or PDF document through the “Submissions” tab (one or more documents can be uploaded)
Discussions: All (1) Open (1)
Page last updated: 23 Sep 2022, 09:02 AM