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Understanding the Effects of Marine Vessel Activity on Coastal Environments

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Introduction

Through the Oceans Protection Plan, the Government of Canada is working to protect coasts, waterways and marine ecosystems that are vulnerable to the effects of marine shipping.

The Cumulative Effects of Marine Shipping (CEMS) initiative was established as part of the Oceans Protection Plan to help us develop a better understanding of the past, present, and future effects that marine shipping has on coastal and marine environments and Indigenous ways of life.

Through this initiative, Transport Canada is working with Indigenous peoples, coastal communities and local stakeholders to identify and assess issues associated with marine shipping activities and their impact on the environment. The initiative is also collecting information, conducting analysis and making recommendations to mitigate the impact of these marine shipping activities, which will help policy makers and communities make decisions that are based on evidence.

Regionally, we’re working with Indigenous partners and stakeholders in six pilot areas on all three coasts to study regional cumulative effects. At each pilot study area, priority stressors from marine shipping activities are being selected and assessed for their impacts on regionally specific environmental, social, and cultural values.

These pilot areas include:

  • North Coast British Columbia
  • South Coast British Columbia
  • St. Lawrence and Saguenay Rivers, Quebec
  • Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia
  • Placentia Bay, Newfoundland
  • Cambridge Bay, Nunavut

Transport Canada is developing a national framework for assessing the cumulative effects of marine shipping by engaging and working with:

  • Indigenous peoples (First Nations, Inuit and Métis)
  • Coastal communities
  • Port Authorities
  • Non-governmental environmental organizations
  • Marine science organizations
  • Academics
  • Industry
  • Other government departments

Next Steps

Transport Canada is working with Indigenous partners and stakeholders at each of the six pilot areas to advance this initiative. We’ll release a draft version of the CEMS National Framework in fall 2020 for public review and comments.

For any questions or inquiries regarding Transport Canada’s CEMS initiative, please email TC.MarineAssessment-EvaluationMaritime.TC@tc.gc.ca.

Visit the Cumulative Effects of Marine Shipping web page to learn to learn What we've heard so far.



Introduction

Through the Oceans Protection Plan, the Government of Canada is working to protect coasts, waterways and marine ecosystems that are vulnerable to the effects of marine shipping.

The Cumulative Effects of Marine Shipping (CEMS) initiative was established as part of the Oceans Protection Plan to help us develop a better understanding of the past, present, and future effects that marine shipping has on coastal and marine environments and Indigenous ways of life.

Through this initiative, Transport Canada is working with Indigenous peoples, coastal communities and local stakeholders to identify and assess issues associated with marine shipping activities and their impact on the environment. The initiative is also collecting information, conducting analysis and making recommendations to mitigate the impact of these marine shipping activities, which will help policy makers and communities make decisions that are based on evidence.

Regionally, we’re working with Indigenous partners and stakeholders in six pilot areas on all three coasts to study regional cumulative effects. At each pilot study area, priority stressors from marine shipping activities are being selected and assessed for their impacts on regionally specific environmental, social, and cultural values.

These pilot areas include:

  • North Coast British Columbia
  • South Coast British Columbia
  • St. Lawrence and Saguenay Rivers, Quebec
  • Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia
  • Placentia Bay, Newfoundland
  • Cambridge Bay, Nunavut

Transport Canada is developing a national framework for assessing the cumulative effects of marine shipping by engaging and working with:

  • Indigenous peoples (First Nations, Inuit and Métis)
  • Coastal communities
  • Port Authorities
  • Non-governmental environmental organizations
  • Marine science organizations
  • Academics
  • Industry
  • Other government departments

Next Steps

Transport Canada is working with Indigenous partners and stakeholders at each of the six pilot areas to advance this initiative. We’ll release a draft version of the CEMS National Framework in fall 2020 for public review and comments.

For any questions or inquiries regarding Transport Canada’s CEMS initiative, please email TC.MarineAssessment-EvaluationMaritime.TC@tc.gc.ca.

Visit the Cumulative Effects of Marine Shipping web page to learn to learn What we've heard so far.