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Q1 – What information or safety measures do you feel are missing from the report?

almost 2 years ago

*Note: The views and opinions expressed in this discussion forum are those of the participants and do not express the views or opinions of the Steering Committee or any specific members

Consultation has concluded

  • TimH almost 2 years ago
    I live and ride in rural BC. There is no cycling infrastructure whatsoever. This means that the road shoulders are my only protection from vehicles. The problem is that the shoulders are typically covered in debris both from natural and highway sources. Shredded tires from trucks, tree limbs and bark dropped by logging trucks, and a heavy coating of sand/gravel left over from winter are common hazards. The shoulders might be cleaned once a year, if you're lucky.It needs to be recognized that clean shoulders are necessary for cyclist safety in rural areas.
  • Brian Denton almost 2 years ago
    Road user education is of critical importance to road safety. Of particular importance is for all road users to have a proper understanding of the numerous hazards that exist on our streets and highways. One major hazard is related to the widths of transport trucks, the widths of traffic lanes and the distances travelled at various speeds, as measured in meters or feet travelled per second. Transport trucks in Canada are allowed to be 2.6 meters in width. In addition, the exterior rear view mirrors on transport trucks are allowed to extend upwards to 0.3 meters from either side of these vehicles, resulting in transport trucks commonly having an effective width of upwards to 3.2 meters. This compares to the traffic lanes on our city streets often having a width of only 3.0 meters and the width of traffic lanes on our highways and freeways being only 3.7 meters. Transport trucks therefore have an effective width exceeding the width of some of our city streets and marginally narrower than the widths of traffic lanes on our highways and freeways. When one considers that at 50 km/hr a transport truck is travelling at 13.9 meters per second and at 100 km/hr at 27.8 meters per second, it is stunning to understand the small margin for error that exists on our streets, highways and freeways. In short, there is no room for error on our roads, especially when transport trucks are involved and especially for vulnerable road users. The above is essential understanding for all road users and should form a part of a well-designed road safety educational program for all schools throughout Canada.Brian DentonAuthor "Staying Safe on our Roads: The Small Margin for Error"
  • richardcampbell almost 2 years ago
    SIde guards - Dump Trucks with Pup Trailers - While the report does include side guards in general, it does not mention dump trucks with pup trailers. Dump trucks with pup trailers quite common in many urban areas due to high levels of construction. Pedestrians and cyclists may not be aware that there is a trailer following the dump truck and accidentally step out in front or change lanes once the dump truck has passed and get hit by the trailer. In the past two years, at least 2 pedestrians have been killed in BC alone by dump truck pup trailers. In March 2016 a 31-year-old Vancouver woman was killed in East Vancouver Thursday after she was struck by a trailer being towed by a dump truck, say police.http://www.vancouversun.com/news/police+investigate+fatal+traffic+collision+rupert+broadway/11820940/story.html In June 2017, a 51-year-old man was struck and killed in downtown Penticton Thursday afternoon. Police say the Penticton man was crossing Eckhardt Avenue between Martin and Main streets when he was hit by the trailer of a dump truck. A witness told Global News he was seen walking between the tandem dump trailers.https://globalnews.ca/news/3566869/man-killed-while-crossing-the-street-in-penticton/ While I could not find this online, around 15 years ago, a pedestrian was killed in Downtown Vancouver after he stepped in-front of and was struck by a dump truck’s pup-trailer. Also, in Oct 2012, a Hamilton woman was was struck by a trailer being pulled by a dump truck after she stepped off the sidewalk with her bike to cross Barton Street.“For whatever reason, she stepped in between the truck and the front of the (trailer),” Hamilton Police Detective Constable Matt Hewko said at the time.http://www.metronews.ca/news/hamilton/2012/10/01/cyclist-killed-by-dump-truck-loved-to-learn.html It took just 30 minutes to find this examples. I expect a more in depth search would find many more. Walker Blocker has teamed with Seattle’s Department of Transportation(SDOT) in a one of kind experiment. Side Guards were installed on a Pup-Trailer. The custom design by Walker Blocker was created with the natural use of the pup-trailer and maximum safety in mind. You will notice in the photo that the front is tapered so that dumping can continue. The brackets were created to withstand heavy loads and perpendicular force. The side guards extend vertically to prevent anyone from tipping over into the inside. The height from the ground was designed to allow for maximum clearance when entering a field of gravel or dirt. Walker Blocker took into account all the practical applications of the pup-trailer. SDOT plans to put the Pup-Trailer through normal activity and then assess its functionality. If it works they plan to upfit the remaining pup-trailers in their fleet. More at: http://walkerblocker.com/portfolio-item/pup-trailer-with-truck-side-guards/ In addition, part of the problem likely is the lack of strong visual indication near eye level that the dump truck is pulling a trailer. In addition to side guards, some type of highly visible strip or panel connecting the dump truck to the trailer may help. The Walker Blocker side guard, while an improvement, may be too low to be noticed by everyone.http://walkerblocker.com/portfolio-item/pup-trailer-with-truck-side-guards/
  • arnoS almost 2 years ago
    Not sure if leading pedestrian/cycling intervals have been mentioned. Namely, give people walking and cycling a small head start over drivers. Also fully protected intersections where people walking have separate signal phases over people driving. Example is Burrard/Pacific in Vancouver.
  • arnoS almost 2 years ago
    Universal cycling safety instruction in our elementary schools. This is already happening in some municipalities like Surrey, New Westminster and Maple Ridge but should be universal across Canada. Many European counties have this
  • arnoS almost 2 years ago
    London is establishing good rules to improve truck safety including the restriction of unsafe vehicles from city streets. We should follow suit.https://www.ft.com/content/78d33ca8-8665-11e6-a29c-6e7d9515ad15
  • arnoS almost 2 years ago
    There is nothing on truck driver schedules and mandatory breaks from driving. My understanding is that regulations have recently been watered down to dangerous levels. We do need to go the other way to ensure that truck drivers are not driving while sleep deprived.
  • jfmezei almost 2 years ago
    The issue of oncoming traffic on 2 lane rural roads such as the Trans Canada highway in Ontario (the 17) was not raised. Trucks and motorhomes overtake other cars at relatovely low speed (so overtaking takes long time), itnoring the fact that there is a cycling occupying what they consider their passing lane. (aka: truck barreling at cyclisng at 101kmh with no room for cyclist to go).Secondly, your document omits the issue of potholes which are always on side of the road where cyclists are expected to ride, and may appear unpredictable to drivers when they MUST go around a major hole. This is far mroe important than some side guard on trucks.Third: when a large vehicle overtakes a cyclist, the cyclists has no clue on the length of the vehicle. This becomes important with road trains, or a truck pulling a trailer supporting a small bullzozer etc. Fourth: your document does not deal with vehicles whose width is incompatible with narrow roads (read: dump trucks).
  • jfmezei almost 2 years ago
    Another important poimt not raised, but parhaps not directly related to heavy vehicles: having bike lanes on wrong side of road with cyclist traveling against traffic should NEVER be allowed. Dangers at every intersection.
  • richardcampbell almost 2 years ago
    Use of Small Electric Vehicles and Cargo Bikes for Last Mile Delivery in Urban AreasIn addition to reducing costs, GHG emissions and pollution, the use of small electric vehicles and cargo bikes for last mile delivery in urban areas likely is safer for people walking and cycling than using larger trucks for delivery.http://static.wm3.se/sites/2/media/13985_Logistik_i_städer_med_elfordon_2013_eng.pdf?1403083661 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/317645400_The_potential_of_light_electric_vehicles_for_specific_freight_flows_insights_from_the_Netherlands
  • richardcampbell almost 2 years ago
    Loading Zones - Frequent freight loading either happens in the bikeway or adjacent in the curb side lane. Loading activities increase conflicts crossing the bike lane, or even blockages by double-parked vehicles that imperil bicyclists and rapidly decrease assurances of safety.Provide designated truck loading zones and provide space for other curbside uses to prevent blockages of the bicycle lane. Consider restricting freight loading to off-peak periods. If frequent freight or passenger loading is observed, provide protected bicycle facilities regardless of speed and volume, or move passenger and freight loading uses to a cross-street.Provide a wide marked buffer adjacent to the vehicle door zone to guide bicyclists clear of dooring conflicts for both buffered and protected bike lanes.https://nacto.org/publication/urban-bikeway-design-guide/designing-ages-abilities-new/strategies-reduce-sources-stress/
  • richardcampbell almost 2 years ago
    Floating bus stops known as 'bus stop bypass' or “side boarding islands”, are an arrangement that involves a cycleway running behind the passenger boarding area at a bus stop, between an island and the footway. The bypass consists of cycle track which should be separated by kerbs from the footway, with minor level difference. They eliminate conflicts between cyclists and buses at bus stops.Care needs to be taken to reduce conflicts between cyclists and bus passengers.https://nacto.org/publication/transit-street-design-guide/stations-stops/stop-configurations/side-boarding-island-stop/ https://www.cycling-embassy.org.uk/dictionary/floating-bus-stop
  • richardcampbell almost 2 years ago
    Safe passing distances have been specified by over 27 jurisdictions in North America, including Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia as well as several in Europe. Safe passing laws have often specify a minimum distance of 1 metre or 3 feet (0.91m) but a growing number of jurisdiction are specifying a minimum distance of 1.5 metres in at least some situations. Especially at higher motor vehicle speeds, 1.5 metres provides a greater margin for error. The air turbulence from large vehicles travelling at high speeds can knock a cyclist off balance. A cyclist fatality in Maine was likely caused by the draft of a tractor-trailer passing at a distance of around 4 feet (1.22m). Maine’s law requires motorists passing cyclists to stay at least 3 feet (0.91m) away. http://www.bikemaine.org/coalition-news/maine-cyclists-death-shows-risks-of-draft-from-big-vehicles-pph The League of American Bicyclists’ Model Safe Passing Law includes:If there is more than one lane for traffic proceeding in the same direction, move the vehicle to the lane to the immediate left, if the lane is available and moving into the lane is reasonably safeModel Safe Passing Law, The League of American Bicyclists, http://bikeleague.org/content/model-safe-passing-law-0 Accessed Apr 13, 2017. They state that it is an improvement as:It requires drivers of motor vehicles to treat a person on a bicycle like any other vehicle when traveling on a road with more than one lane traveling in the same direction. This is modeled after the laws of Nevada (NRS 484B.270(2)) and Delaware (4116) and is important for at least two reasons: 1) the majority of people killed while biking are killed on arterial roads (57% in 2013), which are likely to have more than one lane traveling in the same direction, and 2) the most common reason a bicyclist is killed is an unsafe pass by a motor vehicle driver. We believe this rule can be easily enforced, easily made clear to the public, and is likely to save lives.The Nevada’s safe passing law requires moving the vehicle into the immediate left lane, if there is more than one lane in the same direction. http://www.leg.state.nv.us/Session/76th2011/Bills/SB/SB248_EN.pdf Ottawa bike police are using a sonar device to measure the distance between drivers and cyclists. http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/ottawa-police-to-drivers-beware-the-one-metre-bike-rule As in Ontario and other jurisdictions, we also recommend an educational campaign be undertaken to ensure motorists are aware of the law before enforcement campaigns. From R Aldred et al, Cycling Near Misses : Findings from One Year of the Near Miss Project, The Near Miss Project, 2015, http://www.nearmiss.bike/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/Nearmissreport-final-web-2.pdf p 10.Close passes account for almost 1/3 of the threatening encounters people cycling have with those drivingPeople who cycle more slowly (under 13 km/h vs. 19 km/h) report 3 times as many near missesClose passes are a greater problem for women, who on average cycle more slowly and experience a 50% higher rate of near misses than menPolice initiatives to tackle drivers who pass cyclists too closely could prevent up to 28% of the crashes that kill and seriously injure cyclists, according to an analysis of crash data http://road.cc/content/news/218268-close-pass-policing-could-stop-almost-third-crashes-kill-or-seriously-injure West Midlands Police Traffic Unit The number of cyclists killed or seriously injured decreased by 20% in the year since an operation targeting unsafe passing was launched. C Reid, Bike Biz, Police crackdown on "close pass" drivers leads to huge safety gains, http://www.bikebiz.com/news/read/police-crackdown-on-close-pass-drivers-leads-to-huge-safety-gains/021888 Accessed Sept. 29, 2017 Almost 200 offenders were stopped with 13 prosecuted and around 350 others fined and given licence points after the review of helmet- and dash-cam footage. Close passes were reported to have been cut in half.Queensland Queensland’s two-year safe passing law trial included an educational campaign. The safe passing law was made permanent in 2016. A review of the trial found (Minimum Passing Distance Road Rule Evaluation – Final Report, CARRS-Q, https://www.tmr.qld.gov.au/-/media/Safety/roadsafety/Road-safety-research-reports/2_Evaluation-Qld-Minimum-Passing-Distance_Feb-2016.pdf?la=en ):73.2% of riders agreed or strongly agreed that they have observed motorists giving bicycle riders more room when overtaking than they used toOnly 1.5% of cyclists and 5% of drivers were unaware of the lawThere was a reduction in fatalities and serious injuries since the start of trial but it is difficult to specifically attribute these reductions to the lawMost police officers agreed with the need for the law although enforcement was challenging
  • Brian Denton almost 2 years ago
    Road user education is essential if we are ever to have safe roads in Canada. I urge the Steering Committee to review my book "Staying Safe on our Roads; The Small Margin for Error." In this book you will come to understand the complexities of road safety and the need for all road users to have a proper understanding the numerous hazards that exist on our roads. This book was first published in June 2016 and is available through Amazon.
  • Marcel J Huculak almost 2 years ago
    The speed management seems to be at a high level. One more specific strategy is to recognize how impact speed affects outcomes. Safety evidence shows that at an impact speed of 30 km/h, pedestrians have a 10% chance of being killed. Below 30 km/h this probability slowly declines to about 5% at near zero speeds (at these low speeds fatalities are mostly a factor of vehicle mass and a crushing force). Above 30 km/h this probability increases rapidly, to over 80% of our common urban default speed limit of only 50 km/h. In my practise as a transportation engineer I use this information to find solutions that limit vehicle speeds to 30km/h or less at conflict points with vulnerable users. There are a wide range of specific devices that are effective - speed humps, roundabouts, chicanes, speed tables, raised cross walks, camera enforced speed zones.Theses are difficult conversations for practitioners and the public. We were born and raised in a car culture that created a default speed of 50 km/h in the absence of any evidence. But we now have that evidence it is time we act on it. There are many places I've seen this impact speed/fatality probability evidence quoted. Here is one:http://www.who.int/roadsafety/projects/manuals/speed_manual/en/
  • Marcel J Huculak almost 2 years ago
    I noticed camera based countermeasures mounted at fixed locations, but I did not see anything for on-board cameras on heavy vehicles. I see three benefits of these cameras:1. Driver accountability2. Witness to vehicle and driver actions 3. Research to improve vehicle and driver performance. I know some people express privacy issues with such cameras. Three points to such issues. First, driving is a privilege, not a right. Second, when people's lives are at stake, we allow the law to bend against privacy. For example, at airports we are treated as guilty until proven innocent in terms of security to the air-side, all in the name of safety. Third some camera systems constantly record a buffer of say 30s, and only write this buffer to a permanent recording device if an event occurs that exceeds a tolerance of extreme acceleration or deceleration. This helps protect driver privacy for non-safety issues.
  • lightfootatlarge almost 2 years ago
    Smart Growth America's 'Safer Streets, Stronger Economies' survey of 37 Complete Streets project outcomes across the USA https://www.smartgrowthamerica.org/app/legacy/documents/safer-streets-stronger-economies.pdf
  • lightfootatlarge almost 2 years ago
    I didn't see any information about priority hierarchy of road users. In terms of public health promotion and safety for vulnerable road users around heavy vehicles, priority should be thus: Firstly walkers, runners, cyclists, taxis & public transit, delivery vehicles, car sharing and lastly private automobiles. Where there is a conflict between safety for vulnerable road users and economic impact of limiting movement of trucks, safety for VRUs first. This hierarchy should help guide decisions.
  • lightfootatlarge almost 2 years ago
    The Moving Beyond Zero (Sweden) initiative http://movingbeyondzero.com/ was not addressed. "The public health and quality of life benefits of active mobility need to be given a more prominent role in the traffic safety discourse and in the socioeconomic models used for assessing infrastructure initiatives."
  • Bob almost 2 years ago
    The report did not address this -Cyclist and pedestrian paved paths should be slightly graded or crested so water runs off and injuries from frozen water puddles are avoided.Standing water on ashpalt deteriorates the pavement and creates tripping and slipping hazards.
  • Islandrider68 almost 2 years ago
    There is nothing about:- Ongoing driver education & testing. - Cyclist education. Many cyclists do not know or follow the rules of the road. - Changing of driver attitudes. Drivers need to start thinking of the whole population rather than just themselves. (i.e. we are all in this together so let's work together to get where we are going)- The only thing a driver should be doing is driving. Not toughing a mobile device, not petting a pet on their lap.- Rear bumpers on trucks- Interactions between large vehicles & motorcycles (Perhaps Lane splitting or prioritization of bikes at lights so no motorcyclist is ever squished between a stopped vehicle and one where the driver fails to stop on time.)
  • jfmezei almost 2 years ago
    Another issue not raised: with the advent of electric vehicles (and especially electric buses), there should be a standard, agreed upon white noise emitted by these vehicles so a cyclist will know a large vehicle is coming from behind. This becomes significant if there are potholes ahead so that the cyclist can start pothole avoidance well before so bus driver can adapt, or cyclist realises there is no time to do this and must apply emergency brakes before falling into the pothole.
  • SaferCyclingCalgary almost 2 years ago
    "Safe Bicycling Guidelines Booklet: There is no known program for educating cyclists to the dangers of riding near trucks; other safety advice." What cycling experts did you consult?? CAN-BIKE operates all across Canada and one of the things we teach is safety around large vehicles. CAN-BIKE is a nationally standardized educational program on cycling for transportation. - Signed a Certified CAN-BIKE Instructor.